The Louisville Creative School

The Louisville Creative School is raising funds with an IndieGoGo.com campaign, and is a verified nonprofit.

Louisville Creative School  |  Colegio Creativa de Louisville  |  Ludovicopolis Ludus Artificorum  |  Λούισβιλ Σχολή Παντέχνη  |  مدرسة أبداع لويسفيل  |  יצירתית לואיוויל הספר בית

Mission Statement: The mission of the Louisville Creative School is to prepare students artistically and personally to matriculate into the rigors of academia with classically enriched skills, creativity, integrity and a respect for culturally diverse environments.

Goals
:

Fine Arts Infused Education
:

  • Young students (ages 3 to 6) experience their world in physical ways, so the many creative arts will be a daily part of the learning environment.
  • Creative self-expression leads to greater excitement about learning, and development of fine and gross motor skills, in a non-competitive environment.
  • The creative arts improves language acquisition because of the narrative nature of children’s art.

Classical & Modern Language Infused Education:

  • Classical language education improves vocabulary comprehension, cultural understanding, and rational thought.
  • Learning a second language in childhood is as easy as learning the first language, and greatly increases the ease of third language acquisition.
  • Foreign language study increases student ability to function in an increasingly multicultural and interconnected world.

Experiential Classical Education:

  • Classical education depends on a three-part process of training the mind, where the early years of school are spent in absorbing facts, systematically laying the foundations for advanced study. In the middle grades, students learn to think through arguments. In the high school years, they learn to express themselves.
  • Classical education programs include a heavy emphasis on all subject areas of self-expression, including drawing, painting, poetry, literature, history, and the dramatic speaking arts.
  • Classical education recognizes the whole child must be developed and taught in accordance with Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences, and that the educational methods must adapt to the student.

Louisville Creative School Arts Education Models:

Arts Infused Education:

  • Early childhood students (ages 3 to 6) will experience their world in physical ways, and the many creative arts will be a daily part of the Louisville Creative School learning environment.
  • Development of fine and gross motor skills, in a non-competitive environment.
  • Creative self-expressions leads to greater excitement about learning.
  • Improves language acquisition because of the narrative nature of children’s art.

Classical Education Model:

  • Classical education depends on a three-part process of training the mind.
  • The early years of school are spent in absorbing facts, systematically laying the foundations for advanced study. In the middle grades, students learn to think through arguments. In the high school years, they learn to express themselves. This classical pattern is called the Trivium.
  • In the middle and high school years, the students move into the Quadrivium, where they learn to think through arguments, and how to express themselves.
  • The Louisville Creative Centre

    The Louisville Creative Centre

The Trivium is Comprised of Three Subjects:

  1. Grammar.
  2. Logic.
  3. Rhetoric.

The Quadrivium Comprised of Four Subjects:Arithmetic.

  1. Geometry (Drawing).
  2. Music (Arts).
  3. Astronomy (Science).

Classical Language Education:

  • Francis Bacon wrote that ‘The scholar’s first duty is to learn languages, so that he can communicate with all men of wisdom, learning, and commerce.’
  • Classical language education improves vocabulary comprehension, cultural understanding, rational thought through the study of grammar.
  • Learning a second language in early childhood is as easy as learning the first language, and greatly increases the ease of third language acquisition.
  • Increases historical and cultural capital through the study of history of Latin, and its impacts on world history.
  • Classical language education improves vocabulary comprehension, cultural understanding, and rational thought.
  • Increases student ability to function in a multicultural world.

To find out more about the Louisville Creative School project, please click here. To contribute to the fund raising campaign, please click here.

(All contributions are considered unrestricted gifts and can’t be specified for any particular purpose. The Louisville Creative School campaign is a Flexible Funding campaign, which means that Louisville Creative School will receive all funds raised even if it does not reach its goal.)

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3 thoughts on “The Louisville Creative School

  1. Excerpt From “Continuous Creation,” Chapter 7: “Tafari,” by James H. Peterson III:

    “Can we do a flat-world?” Keith asked. “I’ve always wanted to see a bunch of guys sail off the side of the world and explode in vacuum. It’d be fun.”

    “Na,” Mick said with a sigh. “The Spindles did the flat-world thing already.”

    “Alright then, how about a trapezoid?” Keith asked throwing his hands up over his head to form a pointed edge.

    “No.”

    “How about an icosahedron then?”

    “What’s the difference between a 20-sided cube and a sphere?” Mick asked.

    “We can play dice with the 20-sided planet,” Keith said making gestures as if he was throwing craps.

    “I mean, after you put on the mountains and everything, it won’t matter much, will it?” Mick asked.

    Keith looked deflated.

    “The Infinity Plane,” Chukwu said.

    Keith looked at Mick.

    Mick looked at Keith.

    It was obvious to both of them. They had both forgotten that Chukwu was there at all. They turned to look at the old man.

    Chukwu sat cross-legged upon a patch of lush green grass that extended past his body for a couple of feet in every direction away from his body. Chukwu was shaping what appeared to be a large Bonsai tree, standing about 3 feet out of the grass. The knarled curls of the root system alone suggested that the tree was hundreds of years old already. The detail though suggested that the tree was in reality much larger but had been compressed in space. The book sat beside Chukwu.

    “It’s a Sequoia sempervirens,” Chukwu said conversationally.

    “Uh huh,” Mick said.

    “I always called them California Redwoods,” Keith said. “We had them all over Cali when I was there last. I hear they didn’t fare so well in the Succession War of 2525.”

    Chukwu shrugged.

    “What’s an infinity plane?” Mick asked.

    “Do you want math in your answer?”

    “No.”

    “Think of your world being flat, at the base-line, but that it never ends,” Chukwu said. “Think of it going on infinitely in all directions in a 3-dimensional space.

    Mick thought about it for a moment and frowned.

    Keith thought about if for a moment and smiled.

    Mick thought, how would you get a sun to orbit and infinity plane? What would the sun go around if the planet extended in all directions? A star couldn’t orbit infinity, could it?

    Keith thought about every video game he’d every played that lined up armies of little cyber men that marched against other little armies of cyber men. In every single one of those games, you eventually ended up running into a big black wall that you couldn’t move past. Even games that were played on a “globe” where you could curl around the map from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean usually never let you go over the poles. If America were going to attack Russia for example with ICBMs, they wouldn’t fly the missiles to Poland first. They’d just shoot them up over Canada and go into the Motherland.

    “I love it,” Keith agreed.

    “I hate it,” Mick disagreed. “How would you get the stars to shine light upon the surface if they can’t orbit the planet?”

    “Oh, that’s simple enough,” Keith, said. You just line them up at the intervals you need, and there you go.”

    “And days.”

    “Hmm,” Keith said. “Put a planet really close to the sun yeah, and have that orbit the sun.”

    “Wouldn’t work,” Mick said flatly. “Even Mercury takes 89 days to travel around the sun. It’d never work.”

    “Why?” asked Chukwu, returning to designing Tafari’s first tree. “Just make it so that there is light. Was it not written that the Creator said ‘Let there be light, and there was?’ Let the mortals figure it out later. They are good at that figuring it out thing. And the best part is that they won’t think that it can’t be done, because it has been done all their lives.”

    “Well, we can always do Around the Sun In 80 Days,” Keith said.

    “90,” Mick corrected.

    Has that tree gotten bigger since I’ve been watching it? Mick wondered.

    “Well, science, for one thing,” Mick started.

    “Astrophysics for another,” Keith added.

    “So?” Chukwu asked forming a face in the bark of the base of the tree.

    “Look, you just can’t do that,” Mick said. “The universe won’t allow it-”

    “Have you ever met a talking tree?” Chukwu asked.

    “Not sober,” Keith cut in. “I got good and pissed before I went in to see the second “Lord of the Rings” movie. It was bloody brilliant until I realized I’d been out back for a couple of hours talking to trees in my yard.”

  2. Robert Morri says:

    Well,that does answer my second question,but what about the first?Is Mr.Infinity your boat or is it that they just would not let you have the monopoly?

  3. No, not my boat. I only doggie paddle in the shallow end. A well bubbled hot tub is about as deep into the water as I ever want to go.

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