“The Greatest American Hero”

I really miss this show. I’ve always like the reluctant hero mythos, as long as it doesn’t cross the line into the Woody Allen sort of shyt. I’ve also thought for a long time that “The Greatest American Hero” would make an excellent premise for a series of novels. The basic premise is that an alien species of powerful beings have given a superhero suit of powers, the instruction manual for which he promptly loses.

The show was created by Stephen J. Cannell, and starred William Katt, Robert Culp, Connie Sellecca, Michael Paré, and Faye Grant.

The Greatest American Hero Pilot 1981

The show attempted a spin off called “The Greatest American Heroine,” which did not come off, but which did become one of the most amusing episodes of the series.

The Greatest American Heroine

The Logic of War: “Fortress,” a Short Film by Dima Fedotof

In the following short film titled “Fortress,” from Russian film Director Dima Fedotof eloquently demonstrates the logic of war.

Крепость/Fortress

Dima Fedotof writes of his own work:

Hello! My name is Dima, I am CG enthusiast from Russia. This is cartoon parable. Despite the fact that mankind is killed, the war still continues. War continued with automated system left by people. One of the last surviving bomber and its pilot still performs its task. The city is dead for a long time. Dead people who built it. Dead people who gave the order to destroy the city. And war will continue until subside echo of humanity.But life will always find a way to survive. Cassette bomb submunitions became a fortress for the grass.

“An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge,” by Ambrose Bierce

A LibriVox reading of “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge,” by Ambrose Bierce, published in 1890.

“An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge by Ambrose Bierce,” by Ambrose Bierce as Read by Matthew Stewart-Fulton

This on the other hand is the “Twilight Zone” version of “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge,” originally aired on CBS in 1964. It’s not bad as far as adaptations go. Of course it helps that an audio recording of the original short story is about 18 minutes long and that adaption is about 25. The case is usually the reverse.

“The Twilight Zone’s” “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”